Maggie Valley Summer Rally

Hot Rod Car Show

August 18 – 19, 2017
Purchase  Advanced Discounted Weekend Rally Tickets Online

Bring Your Hot Rod! – Bring Your Tent! – Bring Your Chair!
Enjoy The Rally, The Vendors, The Rides, The Entertainment, The Weekend

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Hot Rod Car Show (Judged Show)
No Entry Fee – FREE with paid admission.  Includes all concerts and events all weekend events.   Your vehicle will be judged Saturday after 2:00 PM

Registration
Register at Show at the Car / Bike Show Registration Tent.
Hot Rod Car Show – Show Registration & Exhibit – 3:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Hot Rod Car Show – Show Registration & Exhibit – 10:30 AM – 8:00 PM
Hot Rod Car Show – Show Registration & Exhibit – 9:30 AM – 2:00 PM

Judging
Judging starts @ 2:00 PM.

Awards
Top Ten Plus Best Of Show & Peoples Choice Award.  ALL Awards are given out Saturday Aug. 19 @ 5:30 PM at the main stage.

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What is A Hot Rod?
Hot Rods are typically old, classic American cars with large engines modified for linear speed.    The origin of the term “hot rod” is unclear. Roadsters were the cars of choice because they were light, were easy to modify, and could be bought for a low price. The term became commonplace in the 1930s or 1940s as the name of a car that had been “hopped up” by modifying the engine in various ways to achieve higher performance.

The first hot rods were old cars (most often Fords, typically Model Ts, 1928–31 Model As, or 1932-34 Model Bs), modified to reduce weight. Typical modifications were removal of convertible tops, hoods, bumpers, windshields, and/or fenders; channeling the body; and modifying the engine by tuning and/or replacing with a more powerful type.    Speedster was a common name for the modified car. Wheels and tires were changed for improved traction and handling.   “Hot Rod” was sometimes a term used in the 1950s as a derogatory term for any car that did not fit into the mainstream.    Hot Rodders’ modifications were considered to improve the appearance as well, leading to show cars in the 1960s replicating these same modifications along with a distinctive paint job.

Engine swaps often involved fitting the Ford flathead engine, or “flatty”, in a different chassis; the “60 horse” in a Jeep was a popular choice in the ’40s.   After the appearance of the 255 cu inV8, because of interchangeability, installing the longer-stroke Mercury crank in the 239 was a popular upgrade among hot rodders, much as the 400 cu in crank in small-blocks would become.   In fact, in the 1950s, the flathead block was often fitted with crankshafts of up to 4.125 in (104.8 mm) stroke, sometimes more.    In addition, rodders in the 1950s routinely bored them out by 0.1875 in (4.76 mm) (to 3.375 in (85.7 mm)  due to the tendency of blocks to crack as a result of overheating, a perennial problem, this is no longer recommended.   In the ’50s and ’60s, the flatty was supplanted by the early hemi.     By the 1970s, the small-block Chevy was the most common option, and since the ’80s, the 350 cu in Chevy has been almost ubiquitous.

In the mid-1980s, as stock engine sizes fell, rodders discovered the all-aluminum 215 (Buick or Olds) could be stretched to as much as 305 cu in, using: the Buick 300 crank, new cylinder sleeves, and an assortment of non-GM parts, including VW & Mopar lifters and Carter Carb.   Using the 5 liter Rover block and crank, a maximum displacement of 317.8 cu in (5,208 cc) is theoretically possible.

Modern Roding
There is still a vibrant hot rod culture worldwide, especially in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and Sweden.    The hot rod community has now been subdivided into two main groups: street rodders and hot rodders.    Hot rodders build their cars using a lot of original equipment parts, whether from wrecking yards or NOS , and follow the styles that were popular from the 1940s through the 1960s.    Street rodders build cars (or have them built for them) using primarily new parts.

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Maggie Valley Rallys
Sonny Productions LLC
280 Haynes Rd,
Summerfield NC 27358

Office # 336-643-1367Cell # – 336-580-1638
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